How Drones Help Cities Fight the Coronavirus Pandemic

The whole world is now fighting coronavirus. Unfortunately, this infection is spreading easily from person to person . Moreover, scientists say that sooner or later every person will catch it. That’s why it is of prime importance to develop food provision and law enforcement solutions that can guarantee maximum protection. The whole world is having really tough time right now. But this is where drones may come in useful! They proved to be the best and the most effective technologies to fight against Covid-19. So let’s review how drones can replace humans in this situation!

Drones Help Make Sure People Follow Quarantine Restrictions

The main benefit of UAVs is that they can reach absolutely any place easily. To put it simply they can go there where humans can’t. They can fly above high-rise buildings, roads, narrow streets, etc.

But the most important benefit of drones is that they can easily replace the face-to-face contact that can be dangerous today. As a result, they can reduce contamination with the coronavirus. Moreover, drones can also save time and labor. So, let’s move onto practice!

Italy is now using drones to monitor the movements of citizens. First, police officers asked for approval from the Italian Civil Aviation Authority to use drones and this authorization will last till April, 3 (when the travel restrictions to this country will be removed).

Moreover, drones are also used in urban areas of Italy where the population is more exposed to Covid-19. However, the restrictions on the use of drones near airports still exist. A few regions of Italy, are already using UAVs to help check whether the citizens obey quarantine restrictions. Thanks to drones, they managed to find that 92.000 people violate movement restrictions.

Drone Delivery – the Best Measure to Predict Infection

The first drone delivery was conducted five years ago in the USA in collaboration with NASA. Right now, drone delivery can provide support in disaster cases. For example, a Japanese company, Terra Drone is using drones to transport medical samples in the country to fight coronavirus. On February 6, a medical delivery drone flew from one hospital to another in order to deliver some medications.

Antwork’s RA3 and tr7s drones were used to make sure that medical centers have enough quarantine materials. This delivery system significantly reduces contact between people. Moreover, using drones has significantly improved the speed of transportation.

Drones Are Also Used for Disinfection

The main purpose of some drones is to spray pesticides and disinfecting chemicals. You probably already know that Covid-19 is transmitted via respiratory droplets. A special disinfectant spray can stop this process.

Moreover, drone spray has lots of benefits in terms of efficiency. This method is more effective than people spraying. However, to achieve that goal, people should follow certain guidelines. DJI Agriculture, XAG Technology and China Agricultural Machinery Distribution Association published some directions to communicate with authorities. So before spraying, you should make sure that all the efforts were made in a safe manner. 

Consumer Drone Delivery

Drones are also used for delivering consumer items. Unfortunately, not all people have access to grocery shops to buy food. Food delivery to some areas of China was quite challenging. For example, Anxin’s series of isolated islands. To deliver food to this area is a time-consuming procedure that needed at least three modes of transport! That’s why drone delivery rapidly became a feasible measure.

So we can see that drones are a must-have tool that helps the society fight Covid-19.

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